Reimagining Marketing Automation with Pardot Engagement Studio

Yesterday Salesforce launched the general availability of Pardot Engagement Studio, a powerful new UI for creating and reporting on lead nurture and drip campaigns.Elegran was lucky enough to participate in the private beta, and I must admit I'm quite impressed with the new interface and its functionality.

Read more about the product release here and here , or check out a short video of how Elegran implemented the reporting interface below: 

https://www.salesforce.com/blog/2016/06/salesforce-pardot-engagement-studio.html

http://www.pardot.com/blog/salesforce-announces-general-availability-pardot-engagement-studio-b2b-marketing-automation-reimagined/

Elegran specializes in high-end luxury Manhattan real estate, but the firm is also dedicated to being a leader in real estate marketing technology.  We currently have several drip programs running using Engagement Studio, and we've already seen a some incredible results re-engaging lukewarm and forgotten leads, and handing them back over to our sales team to close, continuing to close the loop in our marketing to sales to deal funnel.  

Engagement studio actually empowers Pardot users to listen to numerous "triggers" based on user actions, then channel the customer journey along a personalized drip, visually representing the path to marketers along an intuitive flow diagram , that makes visualizing and reporting upon the success of content and design much more robust and user friendly. 

If anyone has any questions, I'd be happy to share any experience or insight I might have gleaned using the program so far. 


Statsbot Salesforce Commands for Slack

Slack Commands for Salesforce and Google Analytics Automation

I've been a huge fan of Slack for a while now, the team-collaboration tool that is becoming more of an automated work management system than simply an instant message platform.  I use Slack to keep in touch with multiple teams; the marketing team at work, as well as my motorcycle club, including many individuals operating across multiple offices and timezones.  However, the true utility of Slack extends far beyond personal communication, as apps like IFTTT, Zapier and Statsbot actually integrate external software and even devices from Slack Channels and Bots, allowing you to control, report and even automate your personal and professional life directly from Slack. 

Slack commands are incredibly useful, and have replaced many of the myriad calendar, to do list or even project management platforms I've perfunctorily used in the past.  Using the /remind command in Slack allows a bot to schedule a personal reminder at a specific time, on a particular day or in a few hours from now.  Setting reminders for other team members, or even an entire channel is even more useful.  Simply type (in any channel)   "/remind [someone or #channel] [what] [when]" and @slackbot will not only remind you of [what] at that particular time, but keep a log of tasks due and completed in your Direct Message history. There are numerous other incredibly useful "slash" commands to /invite users, take a /poll, or even set up a /call with the #channel, nearly completely supplanting the utility of Skype. 

Slack also integrates with multiple other platforms and devices, allowing you to query and control other platforms directly from Slack.  I can access my Google Drive, or create a Google Hangout directly from within Slack, or integrate with other project management tools like Jira, Asana or Trello. Using IFTTT, I've set up social media posts or mentions to post to a #social channel so I can monitor activity across different sites.  I've set up a Craigslist scrape to post any new motorcycle listed for sale in New York State mentioning the word "Ducati" in the title to a Slack channel in real time. I've configured my Amazon Echo to automatically post reminder to Slack, anytime I add an item to my Alexa To Do list. 

These personal and professional automations save time, but the most impressive app I've seen yet is called Statsbot, which allows you to run Google Analytics and Salesforce reporting directly from within Slack.  As much as I absolutely love running reports in Salesforce  (then exporting and waiting to download a CSV, then finally manipulating the data) @statsbot has native querying language and native graphing tools built into the app.  

For the past month, I've set up automatic weekly and monthly traffic and conversion reporting, so I get a direct message in a private channel as soon as I get a cup of coffee on Monday morning, or right before a marketing meeting. 

Similarly, I've set up alerts for traffic or goal thresholds, that automatically notify me if visits and conversions don't reach or surpass specific targets, so I can make adjustments to the website or any campaign in real-time.  I have similar email alerts set up through GA, or Uptime Robot, but I'm much more likely to notice a Slack notification over a form email. 

Finally, last week Statsbot announced an integration with the Salesforce API, integrated with Slack, that functions similar to the Statsbot Google Analytics integration.  

I can query individual leads or accounts with the info command.  I can query amount won or this week's leads by source, and make marketing adjustments on the fly, rather than wait for an ROI report from a marketing or finance analyst. 
I can query a list of all open opportunities by stage, or even opportunities scheduled to close this month, which is far easier than getting a quote from my favorite Salesforce consultant to build a dashboard.  And, I can get realtime stats on my sales team, how much they're closing, from where and how well they're managing Salesforce. 

Best of all, I can schedule these reports to run hourly, daily or weekly, and report back to me at a specific time, when I think I might need it. 

Slack is quickly becoming the most used software tool in my professional life, as it's giving me realtime insight into various different platforms, social channels, applications and data, that I would need to query individually to use. And Statsbot is quickly becoming one of the most powerful app integrations with Slack as commands and scheduling allow me to automate much of the redundant marketing reporting that previously sucked up much of my team and my time in the past. 


Times Square from ClickZ Live NYC #CZLNY #CZLNY2016


ClickZ is one of the premiere digital marketing summits in the world, and I was lucky enough to attend in NYC this year on behalf of Elegran.com.  At the forefront of online visibility, search is changing, yet links and content are still king. 

While the world wide web moves from our desks to our phones, mobile experience becomes crucial.  Somewhat counterintuitively, as computing power and the human capacity for data transfer increases exponentially, the trend towards mobile fundamentally requires less bits and less code rendered to the end user. 

Finally, from Panda to Penguin to Hummingbird to RankBrain, Google is getting smarter, and while there are still ways to game the system, content creators' long term strategy is only safe if the focus is on value, rather than hacking SEO.

NYDucati takes Manhattan: Stuart Parr's Bike Night

I recently organized a bike night with Stuart Parr at his Art of the Italian Two Wheel exhibit at 285 Madison Avenue in Midtown NYC.  Stuart came out on a 1974 MV Agusta 750S Grand Prix motorcycle, and we tore around Manhattan with around thirty Ducati riders.  Video credit above goes to my friend MrPrufrock and you can find out more about the event and future rides on my Ducati motorcycle blog NYDucati.

Rise and Fall of the NYC Subway System

As New York City mass transit costs increase again for the third time in six years, it's interesting to note that the MTA ridership is still a shadow of what it once was.  I'm a proud passenger of NYC public transit, but it's hard to imagine that the annual travelers on the NYC subway system today is well below the passenger totals of the 1930's and 40's, despite New York having a population of a million or two less people. 

     -via DadaVis

International Anonymity in High End Real Estate

With over half of NYC Condos $5,000,000 and above purchased by anonymous shell companies, New York City has become a haven for the wealthy elite to hide their money in Manhattan real estate.  According to a stunning expose this week in the New York Times Real Estate section,  "government officials and close associates of officials from Russia, Colombia, Malaysia, China, Kazakhstan and Mexico" are taking advantage of American tax loopholes allowing billionaires to literally "house" their money in untraceable, exuberantly expensive condos. 

Opaque shell companies own 57% of the condos at the Bloomberg Tower and Trump International, 64% at Time Warner Center, 69% of condos at The Plaza, 77% of the Condos at One57, sparking public fears that real estate in New York City has become an for foreign wealthy elite to hide their illicit accrual of wealth. The condo boon brings a massive influx of capital into New York City, but also pushes us one step closer to making Gotham into a billionaire's playground. 

Read more on the article here: 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/08/nyregion/stream-of-foreign-wealth-flows-to-time-warner-condos.html

Ad Agency: Copywriters versus Art Directors

In the late 1950s, advertising legend Bill Bernbach came up with the idea of pairing art directors and copywriters into teams. The strategy worked and DDB ended up creating some of the most iconic work of that era. Since then, the art-copy team structure came into existence at most, if not all, agencies.

They maybe working towards a common goal, but as a creative species, copywriters and art directors are not all that similar. Their differences are best highlighted on a Facebook page titled CW versus AD where Caio Pena (art director), Henrique Parada (art director) and Letícia Hanower (copywriter) share their cool, quirky illustrations on this subject. Check out 17 of their best works below.

1. The brush

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 1

 

2. The file

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 2

 

3. What the account manager wants from us

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 3

 

4. Starting from scratch

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 4

 

5. The colors

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 5

 

6. The software

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 6

 

7. The reason for our anger

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 7

 

8. The vintage version

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 8

 

9. The app

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 9

 

10. The Moleskine

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 10

 

11. Reading time

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 11

 

12. How do we know pop culture

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 12

 

13. Leaves office at…

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 13

 

14. The social network

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 14

 

15. The tattoo

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 15

 

16. Wishing Happy Birthday

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 16

 

17. The dream pet

Copywriter Vs Art Director Illustration - 17

(Finally something in common)

       -via CW Versus AD

The New York Metropolitan Opera's History in 10 Graphs

So, the Metropolitan Opera is currently in the news due to the ado over the staging of The Death of Klinghoffer (hooray, opera is socially relevant!). In browsing the Met’s site, I discovered that they keep an amazing public-facing database with details of every performance dating back to the 19th century (why can’t every orchestra do this?). In keeping with the spirit of events, I decided to do some analysis of the last century of opera at the Met (around 24,000 performances).

Check the bottom for information about the data, how I compiled it, and possible errors. 

Klinghoffer, as it turns out, is barely “contemporary.” It was composed in 1991; imagine if “Everything I Do I Do It For You” was considered a current pop song. Anyway, let’s look at the Met’s history of performing operas that have been composed within 25 years. Their record was much different, with regular stagings of operas by Puccini and Wolf-Ferrari in the early 20th century.

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Maybe that’s not fair to the Met. How about performances of pieces written within 50 years? The collapse is quite striking here; most pieces the Met used to be perform were considered “contemporary” in this way.

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Ok, let’s cut to the chase. How many composers were just straight-up dead when the piece was performed?

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The Met’s Composer Gala, 1983:

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If we look at the median year of composition, we can see that it has barely budged in the last century. You’re more or less going to see an opera written around 1870 if you randomly drop by the Met.

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What if we consider this another way: we can graph the distance between a given year and its median year of opera composition. That should give us a measure of “conservativeness:” the relation between a current time and the operatic repertoire the Met is performing.

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Let’s look at the nationalities of composers performed at the Met. Most striking here is the way German opera increases in popularity right up to late-1910s and the late 1930s, when the trend suddenly reverses course. I’m guessing that had to do with certain international events.

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The trend above is vividly demonstrated in the collapse of performances of Richard Wagner starting in the late 1910s and 1930s.

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The general list of operas most performed at the Met are somewhat expected: an assortment of Verdi, Puccini, and Wagner.

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"But wait!" you say. "Why aren’t American composers included above? The Met is an American opera company!" Well, frankly, American composers are more or less a rounding error at the Met. The best showing was a run of "Porgy and Bess" in the mid 1980s. To their credit, it does seem to be improving a bit.

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Lastly, how about a graph of female composers performed at the Met? Thanks to Garrett Schumann for first bringing this to my attention.

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Update 10/28/2014: To clarify, the MET has produced one opera by a female composer: Dame Ethel Smythe’s Der Wald,performed twice in 1903. 

About the data: data was acquired from the Met Opera Database, in a timeframe from 1905 to present. One “performance” is a night of an identifiable opera performance. Opera performances data was scraped from the HTML and matched up to scraped composer/opera data from Wikipedia. The process of scraping/matching may have introduced some error.

The licensing of the Met Opera Database is not clear; if they allow, I will gladly post the dataset of ~24000 performances in its entirety on GitHub for any corrections.

 -via Suby Red