Social Network Age Distribution

deviantArt

This chart should make something very clear; social media is most definitely not just for the young. Some examples:
  • 55% of Twitter users are 35 or older.
  • 63% of Pinterest users are 35 or older.
  • 65% of Facebook users are 35 or older.
  • 79% of LinkedIn users are 35 or older.

However, as you could see in the very first chart of this article, only 2% of social media users are 65 or older (averaged between the sites in this survey).

There is also the flip side of the coin to consider; some sites have a considerable bias toward younger users. A few examples:

  • 58% of Reddit users are under 35.
  • 60% of Github users are under 35.
  • 63% of Hi5 users are under 35.
  • 69% of Hacker News users are under 35.
  • 69% of deviantART users are under 35.
  • 83% of Orkut users are under 35.

A couple of examples of sites with more homogenous user bases, age wise:

  • Hacker News has almost half of its users (44%) in the 18-24 age bracket.
  • Orkut on the other hand has a massive grouping of people aged 25-34. This is so large (76%) that we suspect it may be an anomaly in the Ad Planner data. None of the other sites display such extremes.
  • More than half of DeviantART’s users are below 25.

Average user age per site

Based on the sites in this survey, the estimated age of the average social media user is just under 37 years old. Here are some other observations:

  • The oldest users. LinkedIn has the oldest user base, with the average user being 44.2 years old.
  • The average Facebook user is 40.5 years old.
  • The average Twitter user is 37.3 years old.
  • The age trend for Facebook and Twitter. Compared to a previous survey we did2.5 years ago, the age of the average Facebook user has gone up two years, while the age of the average Twitter user has gone down two years. In other words, Twitter’s user base is getting younger, while Facebook’s is getting older.

And here is the full chart with all the sites, sorted by average age:

social network average age

What about gender?

This whole article so far has been about the age of people using these social networks and online communities. Now it’s time to examine the male-female ratio, or gender balance if you prefer that word.

Based on the United States demographics data (from Ad Planner) there is a clear gender imbalance on many of these sites. Some are much more male dominated, and vice versa. However, when you look at all the data together, it becomes clear that women rule social media. More than two thirds of the sites in this survey have more female than male users.

Other observations:

  • 17 out of 24 sites (71%) have more female than male users.
  • The average gender distribution is 48.75% male, 51.25% female.
  • Most male-dominated site? Slashdot (87% males) is the standout, followed by Hacker News (77% males) and Stack Overflow (76% males). In general, the more tech-focused sites in this survey have more male users than female.
  • Most female-dominated site? Pinterest (79% females) is in a league of its own, followed by Goodreads (70% females) and Blogger (66% females).
  • Facebook and Twitter have the same gender distribution: 40% male, 60% female.

Here below is a chart with the male-female ratios for all 24 sites included in this survey. The chart is sorted, the least male-dominated sites at the top.

social network gender distr

As you can see, the only sites in this survey with more male than female users areQuora, Reddit, Orkut, Github, Stack Overflow, Hacker News and Slashdot.

Final notes

We hope you found this report interesting. It’s easy to get lost when digging through this kind of data, but we hope we managed to present it in a way that gave you a decent overview of the situation today.

To us, one big takeaway from this report is that there’s a place for everyone in today’s social media landscape. These sites have users that span the entire age spectrum, and there really are no limits to what you can achieve online, regardless of age or gender.

from Pingdom

Essex Crossing Lower East Side Development (SPURA) Website Launch

 
I've lived on the Lower East Side for about six years, but I've heard about SPURA from my family since I was a little kid. Finally, the largest plot of contiguous undeveloped land in Manhattan (that's not Central Park) is being developed right down the street from where I live, and they just launched a flashy new website

 Yes, it's full of renderings, and yes, I have mixed feelings about what this development will do to the LES, speeding up the already rapid gentrification of downtown Manhattan, but hopefully this will bring more vibrancy, opportunity and capital to the neighborhood, and it's been a long time coming... The website boast six acres of retail, office, residential real estate (both 1000 affordable apartments and market rate), plus shops, restaurants, a movie theater, park space, gardens, cultural attractions, transportation, and more. You can sign up for periodic updates here.  

Construction begins 2015 (real estate development in 2017) and the entire project is scheduled for completion by 2023.

Tighocom Essex Crossing Website Lower East Side Development SPURA Launches

Etymology Maps about the Geography of Language from Reddit

All of these maps, highlighting the derivation and diaspora of language, were fascinatingly created by Reddit users. In fact, there is now an entire subreddit (/r/etymologymaps) devoted to this.  Several of these were highlighted in an article from The Guardian today.

1. Ananas vs Them 



2. Put on your beer goggles 



3. Does a bear drinking beer sound poetic everywhere? 



4. Arancia happy you're finding out about oranges? 



5. It's all looking rosy 



6. Tea-sing out differences 



7. Rotten apples 



8. Cucumber island 



This article was amended on 14 November 2013 and uses content from this subreddit.

NYC Nabes in Six Words or Less ala </urbane>

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A combination of egocentrism and overzealous real estate agents has led to an overabundance of Manhattan neighborhoods. Here’s a guide to the most popular of them, created with the Attention Deficit Generation in mind.

Marble Hill – Basically the Bronx

Inwood – So far away, why bother

Washington Heights – Good to know Spanish here

Morningside Heights – Columbia trying to make ‘SoHa’ happen

Sugar Hill – Bougie, once upon a time

East Harlem – Sneaker capital of the world

Upper East Side – Old people love it

Upper West Side – Your nanny and kids love it

Columbus Circle – Tenth circle of hell

Rockefeller Center – No one lives here, I hope

Diamond District – Not as fun as it sounds

Theater District – Overdressed people with no style

Turtle Bay – Home of drink specials and wings

Midtown East – Drink here until you’re 21

Tudor City – What is this, even

Times Square – Nightmare for epileptics and everyone

Hell’s Kitchen – Great place to pick up hookers

Garment District – Better name: Bedazzled Ringer-Tee Row

Herald Square – There’s a Macy’s and other stuff

Koreatown – Korean BBQ and karaoke FTW

Murray Hill – Frat boys graduate then move here

Union Square – Wallet hasn’t been stolen? Go shopping

Kips Bay – “It’s a hell of a town”

NoMad – Nickname never stuck, mark as ‘Irrelevant’

Chelsea – Homophobic need not apply

Flatiron District – Looking for SVA? Check American Apparel

Stuyvesant Town – You’ll get lost here if stoned

Meatpacking District – Avoid roofies in your $18 cocktail

Alphabet City – Most expensive place to get stabbed

East Village – Score ramen, a tattoo, or heroin

Little Italy – There are some Italian flags here

Greenwich Village – You can’t afford that townhouse, sorry

West Village – NYU and lots of blue hair

Lower East Side – Narrow bars; be skinny to enter

SoHo – Don’t wear heels here

Chinatown – ‘No smoking’ in bars doesn’t apply

TriBeCa – Celebrities live here, for some reason

South Street Seaport – Where the best buskers perform 

via <urbane/> inspired by egocentrism and overzealous real estate agents